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  • Friday, September 26, 2014 3:44 PM | Ed Graziano (Administrator)

    Tonight @CERA:
    The Chicago Streetcar Pictorial Round Table

    Friday evening, September 26, 2014 – Doors open at 6:30, and the program begins promptly at 7:00 pm
    University Center, 525 S State St, Chicago, IL 60605

    Chicago PCC 7213 on State Street in the early 1950s. This car would end up being the last Chicago streetcar in 1958. (CERA Archives)

    Chicago PCC 7213 on State Street in the early 1950s. This car would end up being the last Chicago streetcar in 1958. (CERA Archives)

    Come join us for the first of three events in our “Chicago PCC Weekend.” Our program will begin with rare films of Chicago streetcars, unseen in 60 years. We will then watch excerpts from the Chicago Streetcar Memories DVD, which will be included with each copy of our forthcoming book Chicago Streetcar Pictorial: The PCC Car Era, 1936-1958 (for more information, see the “CERA News” for September).

    We have assembled a stellar panel for a “round table” discussion of Chicago’s PCCs, including B-146’s authors, Jeff WienDavid Sadowski, and John Nicholson; transportation historians Roy Benedict andGeorge Kanary; and legendary photographers Ray DeGrooteTruman HefnerBob HeinleinBernie Rossbach, and Ken Spengler, whose work is featured in the book. This program will be videotaped for future DVD release.

    There are still plenty of seats available for tonight’s program, so don’t hesitate to come.  We distributed tickets in order to make sure that our out-of-town visitors would be assured of getting in.  However, unfortunately air traffic in and out of Chicago has been halted today due to a fire that damaged equipment that controls all flights in the Midwest.  This means that Truman Hefner will not be able to join us as he had planned.

    As a special bonus, each attendee will receive a commemorative poster, suitable for framing and autographing. These will be distributed at the end of the evening. We look forward to seeing you there!

    The last Chicago streetcar at 81st and Halsted in the early morning hours of June 21, 1958. (Bill Hoffman Photo - CERA Archives)

    The last Chicago streetcar at 81st and Halsted in the early morning hours of June 21, 1958. (Bill Hoffman Photo – CERA Archives)

    This event is part of our Chicago PCC Weekend. We hope you will be able to join us for two special fantrips on the Kenosha Streetcar (Saturday, 9/27) and to the Illinois Railway Museum on Sunday the 28th.

    To give you some of the background information on Chicago’s PCCs, here is an interesting article from the December 1936 issue of Armour Engineer and Alumnus. The Armour Institute is now the Illinois Institute of Technology.

    Author Robert H. Rice was Principal Assistant Engineer in charge of the work of the Board of Supervising Engineers, a partnership between the City of Chicago and the Chicago Surface Lines.

    Your CERA Directors

    FYI, we have received an update on the Eelctroliner restoration project at IRM from Tom Sharratt:

    ELECTROLINER UPDATE

    During the recent Museum Showcase Weekend, several of the key members working on the Electroliner project met to review our progress and re-evaluate what needs to be done. Our original goal was to have the train operational by 2016 at a cost of $500,000. Based on closer inspection of the train, we have determined that major wheel work, perhaps truck work and air brake work needs to be done. We are investigating several options of how the wheel and truck work might be done (it could involve lifting the cars off the trucks and putting them on flat cars or on the ground, which would be very expensive.) Hoses and electrical cables between the cars need to be replaced. The air conditioning system needs to be repaired or replaced. Seals in all the windows need to be replaced (window work has begun), all seats need to be reupholstered (that will start in 2015) and the interior needs to be painted. This review has led to a more realistic – and more expensive – estimate of what the renovation will cost. Optimistically, we now feel it will cost at least $750,000 and it is likely to be more. Our goal is to have the car operational sometime in 2017, and all work completed by 2020. That depends on how much money we are able to raise and such things as scheduling pit time and availability of dedicated workers. Our barn is not heated, and the pit is shared with other departments – it is in high demand. If you are interested in working, leave a message for Ed Oslowski or Rod Turner in the museum office (815) 923 4391 extension 2.

    There is good news. A $25,000 Matching Grant has been approved by the 20th Century Electric Railway Foundation for the restoration of IRM’s Electroliner. In order to receive this grant, we must raise $25,000 in donations – hopefully in the next three months. If we are successful, this money, along with what has already been donated, will allow us to start work on repairing the train’s eight motors (and a spare) and hopefully have them installed late in 2016 or early 2017. Please consider making a generous donation to allow us to double your money! We are nearing the end of the year and urge you to consider a donation that can be used as a tax deduction in 2014. We have raised over $100,000 since our campaign began in July 2013. Now in just three months we can raise half that much with the use of this very generous matching grant! Send your check (memo: Electroliner Fund) to IRM, PO Box 427, Union IL 60160, or visit the IRM website (www.irm.org) and donate through the Museum Store where you can donate in $25 increments (one = $25; two = $50; etc.) Let’s get the Liner back on the mainline!

    The Electroliner was open for inspection during Museum Showcase Weekend, and well over 100 visitors came through. There were a number of items for sale, and almost $900 was collected in the two days. A decision was made that the Electroliner will be open every Memorial Day Weekend and every Museum Showcase Weekend until the renovation is completed, with other special viewing dates possibly added each year. Watch the IRM website. The train will not be moved from its spot in barn 7 for these events due to the time and cost of moving the car and adding air conditioning.

    A new incentive has been added. Donors who give at least $30,000 (cumulative) will receive a special 26”x34” high end giclee print of the 75th Anniversary of the Electroliner on canvas, numbered and signed. We hope that there will be a “meet and greet” event with the artist, Mitch Markovitz. These are hand run, one at a time, from a refined master file and run in eight colors as opposed to four which will be used for the print awarded to donors of at least $1000, which will also be available for purchase by the public. A very limited number of these giclee prints will be prepared, and a certificate of authenticity will be provided with each. They will be numbered and signed by the artist. Mitch was present at the Museum Showcase Weekend meeting and showed the members a draft of his work. It is a unique view of the train on the Skokie Valley Line, and all the members were impressed with the approach and are anxious to see the finished work. Mitch is well known for his unique use of colors and this is no exception. Since this is such a major project that will run for years, requiring significant amounts of money, consideration is being given to adding an incentive to the individual who is the highest donor. No final decision has been made – watch for details at some point in the future.

    Tickets (meaning donations), please . . .


  • Monday, September 22, 2014 3:47 PM | Ed Graziano (Administrator)

    2014 is the 100th anniversary of the Chicago Surface Lines, once the largest street railway system in the world. From 1914 until 1947, CSL was an umbrella agency, made up of a few constituent companies, like Chicago City Railway and Chicago Railways. It was a step along the way towards transit unification and a predecessor of today’s Chicago Transit Authority.

    Here are 47 “mystery photos” from the CSL era. Can you write captions for them, with descriptive information? If so, you might win a prize.

    We’re going to have a contest to see who can come up with the best “who, what, when, where, and how” about these pictures. The person who submits the best overall answers will win a copy of our new DVD data disc, the “Spirit of 76,” which collects the first 76 CERA Bulletins and more.

    Just get your submission in (via e-mail to cerablog1@gmail.com) by midnight Chicago time on Tuesday, September 30th. Please use the numbers included in each caption to identify individual photos. After the contest ends, we will update this post with the best captions. Good luck!

    -The Editor

    PS- This Friday, CERA will celebrate Chicago’s PCC streetcars at our Chicago Streetcar Pictorial Round Table event. Tickets are still available. This is part of our Chicago PCC Weekend, which includes fantrips to Kenosha and the Illinois Railway Museum.

    #1 - Joe L. Diaz Photo - CERA Archives

    #1 – Joe L. Diaz Photo – CERA Archives


    #2 - Edward Frank Jr. Photo - CERA Archives

    #2 – Edward Frank Jr. Photo – CERA Archives

    #3 - Joe L. Diaz Photo - CERA Archives

    #3 – Joe L. Diaz Photo – CERA Archives

    #4 - Joe L. Diaz Photo - CERA Archives

    #4 – Joe L. Diaz Photo – CERA Archives

    #5 - Joe L. Diaz Photo - CERA Archives

    #5 – Joe L. Diaz Photo – CERA Archives

    #6 - Joe L. Diaz Photo - CERA Archives

    #6 – Joe L. Diaz Photo – CERA Archives

    #7 - Joe L. Diaz Photo - CERA Archives

    #7 – Joe L. Diaz Photo – CERA Archives

    #8 - Joe L. Diaz Photo - CERA Archives

    #8 – Joe L. Diaz Photo – CERA Archives

    #9 - Joe L. Diaz Photo - CERA Archives

    #9 – Joe L. Diaz Photo – CERA Archives

    #10 - Joe L. Diaz Photo - CERA Archives

    #10 – Joe L. Diaz Photo – CERA Archives

    #11 - Joe L. Diaz Photo - CERA Archives

    #11 – Joe L. Diaz Photo – CERA Archives

    #12 - William C. Janssen Photo - CERA Archives

    #12 – William C. Janssen Photo – CERA Archives

    #13 - George Kuschel Photo - CERA Archives

    #13 – George Kuschel Photo – CERA Archives

    #14 - Joe L. Diaz Photo - CERA Archives

    #14 – Joe L. Diaz Photo – CERA Archives

    #15 - Joe L. Diaz Photo - CERA Archives

    #15 – Joe L. Diaz Photo – CERA Archives

    #16 - Joe L. Diaz Photo - CERA Archives

    #16 – Joe L. Diaz Photo – CERA Archives

    #17 - CERA Archives

    #17 – CERA Archives

    #18 - CERA Archives

    #18 – CERA Archives

    #19 - Robert F. Collins Photo - CERA Archives

    #19 – Robert F. Collins Photo – CERA Archives

    #20 - Edward Frank Jr. Photo - CERA Archives

    #20 – Edward Frank Jr. Photo – CERA Archives

    #21 - Joe L. Diaz Photo - CERA Archives

    #21 – Joe L. Diaz Photo – CERA Archives

    #22 - CERA Archives

    #22 – CERA Archives

    #23 - Joe L. Diaz Photo - CERA Archives

    #23 – Joe L. Diaz Photo – CERA Archives

    #24 - Joe L. Diaz Photo - CERA Archives

    #24 – Joe L. Diaz Photo – CERA Archives

    #25 - Joe L. Diaz Photo - CERA Archives

    #25 – Joe L. Diaz Photo – CERA Archives

    #26 - CSL Photo - CERA Archives

    #26 – CSL Photo – CERA Archives

    #27 - Joe L. Diaz Photo - CERA Archives

    #27 – Joe L. Diaz Photo – CERA Archives

    #28 - Joe L. Diaz Photo - CERA Archives

    #28 – Joe L. Diaz Photo – CERA Archives

    #29 - Joe L. Diaz Photo - CERA Archives

    #29 – Joe L. Diaz Photo – CERA Archives

    #30 - Joe L. Diaz Photo - CERA Archives

    #30 – Joe L. Diaz Photo – CERA Archives

    #31 - CERA Archives

    #31 – CERA Archives

    #32 - Robert V. Mehlenbeck Photo - CERA Archives

    #32 – Robert V. Mehlenbeck Photo – CERA Archives

    #33 - Joe L. Diaz Photo - CERA Archives

    #33 – Joe L. Diaz Photo – CERA Archives

    #34 - CERA Archives

    #34 – CERA Archives

    #35 - Robert W. Gibson Photo - CERA Archives

    #35 – Robert W. Gibson Photo – CERA Archives

    #36 - CERA Archives

    #36 – CERA Archives

    #37 - CERA Archives

    #37 – CERA Archives

    #38 - CERA Archives

    #38 – CERA Archives

    #39 - Joe L. Diaz Photo - CERA Archives

    #39 – Joe L. Diaz Photo – CERA Archives

    #40 - Joe L. Diaz Photo - CERA Archives

    #40 – Joe L. Diaz Photo – CERA Archives

    #41 - Joe L. Diaz Photo - CERA Archives

    #41 – Joe L. Diaz Photo – CERA Archives

    #42 - Joe L. Diaz Photo - CERA Archives

    #42 – Joe L. Diaz Photo – CERA Archives

    #43 - William C. Janssen Photo - CERA Archives

    #43 – William C. Janssen Photo – CERA Archives

    #44 - Malcolm D. McCarter Photo - CERA Archives

    #44 – Malcolm D. McCarter Photo – CERA Archives

    #45 - Joe L. Diaz Photo - CERA Archives

    #45 – Joe L. Diaz Photo – CERA Archives

    #46 - CERA Archives

    #46 – CERA Archives

    #47 - Joe L. Diaz Photo - CERA Archives

    #47 – Joe L. Diaz Photo – CERA Archives


  • Thursday, September 11, 2014 3:52 PM | Ed Graziano (Administrator)

    September @CERA:

    The Chicago Streetcar Pictorial Round Table

    Friday evening, September 26, 2014 – Doors open at 6:30, and the program begins promptly at 7:00 pm
    University Center, 525 S State St, Chicago, IL 60605

    Post-war PCC 4140 and pre-war car 4051 at the Madison-Austin loop in July 1951. (CERA Archives)

    Post-war PCC 4140 and pre-war car 4051 at the Madison-Austin loop in July 1951. (CERA Archives)

    Come join us for the first of three events in our “Chicago PCC Weekend.” Our program will begin with rare films of Chicago streetcars, unseen in 60 years. We will then watch excerpts from the Chicago Streetcar Memories DVD, which will be included with each copy of our forthcoming book Chicago Streetcar Pictorial: The PCC Car Era, 1936-1958 (for more information, see the “CERA News” for September).

    We have assembled a stellar panel for a “round table” discussion of Chicago’s PCCs, including B-146’s authors, Jeff WienDavid Sadowski, and John Nicholson; transportation historians Roy Benedict andGeorge Kanary; and legendary photographers Ray DeGrooteTruman HefnerBob HeinleinBernie Rossbach, and Ken Spengler, whose work is featured in the book. This program will be videotaped for future DVD release.

    Because we expect the demand for seats may exceed what is available, and due to the presence of many out-of-town visitors, this is a ticketed event.  Admission to this once-in-a-lifetime program is free for current (2014) CERA Members, and $5 for others. You can get tickets here. After 6:45 pm, latecomers will be seated at our discretion. If the event does sell out, we will have a waiting list for tickets in case of any last-minute cancellations.

    As a special bonus, each attendee will receive a commemorative poster, suitable for framing and autographing. These will be distributed at the end of the evening. We look forward to seeing you there!

    -Your CERA Directors

    CTA red Pullman 594 passes Pullman PCC 4131 at Madison and Wells in 1947. There is about 40 years' difference in ages between the cars. The PCC is a Madison car, and 594 is on a variant of the Milwaukee route. We are looking east. (CERA Archives)

    CTA red Pullman 594 passes Pullman PCC 4131 at Madison and Wells in 1947. There is about 40 years’ difference in ages between the cars. The PCC is a Madison car, and 594 is on a variant of the Milwaukee route. We are looking east. (CERA Archives)

    The experimental PCC Model B on display at Chicago's Navy Pier in August 1934. (Pullman Standard photo, courtessy of John Bromley)

    The experimental PCC Model B on display at Chicago’s Navy Pier in August 1934. (Pullman Standard photo, courtessy of John Bromley)

    Pre-war PCC 4008 westbound on 64th near Stony Island. (Joe L. Diaz photo, CERA Archives)

    Pre-war PCC 4008 westbound on 64th near Stony Island. (Joe L. Diaz photo, CERA Archives)

    CSL PCC 4007 at Kedzie Station. (Chicago Surface Lines photo, CERA Archives)

    CSL PCC 4007 at Kedzie Station. (Chicago Surface Lines photo, CERA Archives)

    CSL PCC 4005 on Madison Street, November 23, 1936. (Westinghouse photo, courtesy of John Bromley)

    CSL PCC 4005 on Madison Street, November 23, 1936. (Westinghouse photo, courtesy of John Bromley)

    CTA PCC 7188, northbound on Dearborn at Jackson in April 1957, passes bus 8102. (Richard S. Short photo, CERA Archives)

    CTA PCC 7188, northbound on Dearborn at Jackson in April 1957, passes bus 8102. (Richard S. Short photo, CERA Archives)

    CSL W14 towing a PCC northbound at Kedzie and Harrison in 1947. As you can see by the sign, Chicago, Aurora & Elgin trains stopped at the Kedzie "L" station on the Garfield Park line. (Joe L. Diaz photo, CERA Archives)

    CSL W14 towing a PCC northbound at Kedzie and Harrison in 1947. As you can see by the sign, Chicago, Aurora & Elgin trains stopped at the Kedzie “L” station on the Garfield Park line. (Joe L. Diaz photo, CERA Archives)


  • Thursday, September 11, 2014 3:51 PM | Ed Graziano (Administrator)

    Beginning today, we are accepting payment for 2015 CERA Memberships.  You can also still purchase them for 2014.

    Since 1938, Central Electric Railfans’ Association has hosted programs, published books, and held fantrips.  We have many exciting things planned for this, our 77th year.  Your continued support makes this all possible. Join today, or renew your existing membership, and be a part of it all.

    You can pay for your membership by check, or online via our web site.  We accept PayPal, and you can also pay using a credit or debit card.

    2015 Members will receive a book entitlement.  At the present time, we expect that this book will be published in 2016.  Whatever the subject, you can count on our next publication to continue a long tradition of excellence in historical transit research, while also being both informative and entertaining.

    Members also get discounts on purchasing CERA books, monthly mailings (including program, product information, used book lists, and “CERA News”), plus free admission to our programs.  Be a card-carrying member of CERA!

    Thank you for your support.

    -Your CERA Directors

    PS- If you wish to mail in your payment, click these links for membership forms for 2015 or 2014.


  • Wednesday, September 10, 2014 3:54 PM | Ed Graziano (Administrator)

    Editor’s note:

    When we had our September meeting notices printed, our vendor accidentally left off the “CERA News” from the backside of the sheet.  We did not discover the mistake until the notices were mailed.  Here is the missing notice, exactly as it was supposed to appear in our mailing.

    Our printer has prepared replacement sheets that will be mailed to our members.  Since this was the printer’s mistake, this is being done at no additional cost to CERA.  We apologize for the error.

    References to forms are other enclosures included in the original mailing.  Of course, you can still purchase tickets for our Chicago PCC Weekend events via our website.  You can read more about George W. Hilton here.

    CERA News for September 2014

    George W. Hilton, 1925-2014

    We regret to report the passing of George W. Hilton, a giant in the field of transportation history, and a longtime friend and contributor to the association. The CERA Board of Directors made Professor Hilton our first and so far only Honorary Life Member in February of this year. This honor was made possible due to a change in our By Laws, approved by membership the previous month at our Annual Meeting.

    Used Book Exchange

    Our next used book list will be distributed with October’s program notice. The continued availability of used books is dependent on the generosity of our Members, and we thank you for both your donations and purchases.

    Chicago PCC Weekend

    An order form is enclosed for this month’s events, which begin with the Chicago Streetcar PictorialRound Table on Friday evening, September 26th. Get your Round Table tickets now, before it’s completely sold out!

    We will continue our celebration of Chicago’s PCCs streetcars on Saturday (27th) and Sunday (28th) withInspection Trips to the Kenosha (Wisconsin) Streetcar and the Illinois Railway Museum. CERA has arranged with MCERA Vince Allen’s Victory Bus Service to provide round-trip transportation between the Crystal Lake Metra station and IRM.

    Kenosha runs a half-dozen PCC streetcars over a loop of about two miles in length. On Saturday, we will ride the Chicago Tribute PCC, which rides on authentic Chicago PCC trucks, and have a shops tour. Kenosha’s Philadelphia PCC will be the regular service car on the afternoon of our trip.

    The following day, we will ride the last surviving postwar Chicago PCC, CTA “Green Hornet” 4391, at the Illinois Railway Museum in Union. In addition, the newly restored Chicago & West Towns car 141 andChicago, Aurora & Elgin wood car 36 are expected to be operating for your enjoyment.

    Kenosha is directly accessible by Metra commuter train for Saturday’s fantrip. You can also take Metra on Sunday to the end of the line at Crystal Lake, where our charter bus will take you the rest of the way to IRM. Fantrip tickets and charter bus tickets are available either online, or by using the enclosed ticket order form. Metra offers a weekend pass good for unlimited train rides on both days for just $7, and you can purchase this at the Ogilvie Transportation Center downtown.

    B-146 Progress Report

    We have redoubled our efforts to complete work on Bulletin 146, the Chicago Streetcar Pictorial: the PCC Car Era, 1936-1958 as soon as humanly possible. Layout work on the book is essentially complete; the text sections for the book are finished, the nearly 1000 photos selected, locations identified, captions written and double-checked for accuracy. The DVD inserts are already at the printer, as are the reproduction 1936 CSL brochures that will accompany each copy of the book.

    This book will have more pictures, and with better reproduction quality, than any previous CERA book ever. However, when we started working on the book’s images using Photoshop, looking at the scans under high magnification, it became apparent that there were many imperfections in the 60-year-old slides and negs that require attention. Since an individual image may have upwards of a thousand “fixes” that need to be made, to make things look just as they did when the picture was originally taken, this has proven to be a time-consuming process. But the work is already far along, and we expect this process will be completed in a few weeks. Once the book is turned over to the printer, it will be another 3-4 weeks before the finished copies are printed. They will then be mailed out directly from the printer to you.

    Since we stand behind what we sell, we will cheerfully offer a refund anyone who pre-ordered the book and does not want to wait any longer to receive it. Because the book is already very popular and likely to sell out quickly, we expect that very few people (if any) will take us up on this offer. See you all at our Chicago PCC Weekend events!

    -Your CERA Directors


  • Monday, September 08, 2014 3:55 PM | Ed Graziano (Administrator)

    Kenosha’s streetcar loop is about an hour’s drive from Chicago, and is always worth a visit. Last Saturday, September 6th, Kenosha Area Transit celebrated Kenosha Streetcar Day, as they have annually for some years. All the cars were running, and there were displays and presentations at the shops.

    The weather was absolutely perfect, without a cloud in the sky. You couldn’t ask for better weather.

    Here is a selection of the pictures I shot that day. CERA will be returning to Kenosha on September 27th, as part of our Chicago PCC Weekend events. Tickets for that fantrip are on sale here. We will be using the Chicagao Tribute PCC, and the Philadelphia car will also be running that day. We will have a shops tour as well.

    We hope to see all of you there in just a few weeks. Let’s hope the weather is just like this.

    -David Sadowski

    Passengers board the Chicago tribute car.

    Passengers board the Chicago tribute car.


    DSCF0609

    Kenosha's streetcar operators are always very courteous and friendly.

    Kenosha’s streetcar operators are always very courteous and friendly.

    Interior of the Chicago tribute car.

    Interior of the Chicago tribute car.

    The Pittsburgh tribute car.

    The Pittsburgh tribute car.

    The Koenosha Streetcar Society had a table at the shops.

    The Koenosha Streetcar Society had a table at the shops.

    A Lego PCC car.

    A Lego PCC car.

    Model trains on display.

    Model trains on display.

    This trolley will eventually be restored and painted as the San Francisco tribute car.

    This trolley will eventually be restored and painted as the San Francisco tribute car.

    The Johnstown car, above the inspection pit.

    The Johnstown car, above the inspection pit.

    The Philadelphia car, back in the barn

    The Philadelphia car, back in the barn.

    A PCC accelerator, which works something like a dimmer switch.

    A PCC accelerator, which works something like a dimmer switch.

    Model trains on display at the shops.

    Model trains on display at the shops.

    A Lego version of the Franks Diner, which is a Kenosha landmark.

    A Lego version of the Franks Diner, which is a Kenosha landmark.

    A side view of the Toronto car.

    A side view of the Toronto car.

    The Johnstown tribute car.

    The Johnstown tribute car.

    Car 2185 will be the regular service car on September 27th, during the CERA fantrip.

    Car 2185 will be the regular service car on September 27th, during the CERA fantrip.

    This ex-SEPTA car from Philadelphia is the latest addition to the Kenosha fleet.

    This ex-SEPTA car from Philadelphia is the latest addition to the Kenosha fleet.

    The interior of the Philadelphia car

    The interior of the Philadelphia car.

    The Toronto car (which actually ran there) prepares to turn a corner not far from the Metra depot.

    The Toronto car (which actually ran there) prepares to turn a corner not far from the Metra depot.

    Future railfans of America.

    Future railfans of America.

    There were good crowds on hand, enjoying the ride.

    There were good crowds on hand, enjoying the ride.

    The Pittsburgh tribute car.

    The Pittsburgh tribute car.

    The Cincinnati tribute car.

    The Cincinnati tribute car.

    The Cincinnati tribute car.

    The Cincinnati tribute car.


  • Sunday, September 07, 2014 4:48 PM | Ed Graziano (Administrator)
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  • Sunday, September 07, 2014 4:02 PM | Ed Graziano (Administrator)

    Editor’s Note:

    Frank Hicks is our contest winner.  Here is his winning submission:

    Interesting post, and interesting contest!  I’ll take a stab at it…

    1 – This is the Northampton Station off of the Boston elevated in downtown Boston.  It was built in 1901 and moved to Seashore in 1988 when this section of the elevated was torn down.
    2 – Boston ticket booth in the Visitors Center
    3 – Montreal #2, a sightseeing car built in the company shops in 1906 and nicknamed the “Golden Chariot.”  This car was acquired by Seashore in 1963 and was recently refurbished after a few  years out of service.
    4 – Montreal #2
    5 – Montreal #2
    6 – Long Island Railroad #4137, an MP54A1 heavyweight commuter coach built by the Pennsylvania Railroad in 1930 and retired in 1972, which is when Seashore acquired it.  These cars ran on 600 volts but only operated off of third rail.
    7 – Boston Elevated Railway #5821 is a “Type 5″ lightweight semi-convertible car built by Brill in 1924.  These cars were used all over Boston for many years.  This car was retired in 1954 and acquired by Seashore; it has been fully restored.
    8 – BER #5821
    9 – Connecticut Company #838, a 15-bench double-truck open car built by J.M. Jones & Sons in 1905.  Originally it was Consolidated Railway #838 and then ran for ConnCo until 1948, when it was acquired by Seashore.  Cars like this were famous in later years for use in taking huge crowds to the Yale Bowl in New Haven.
    10 – BER #5821
    11 – Connecticut Company #1160, a typical ConnCo double-truck wooden suburban car of which that company had a large fleet.  This car was built by Stephenson in 1906 as Consolidated Railway #542 (renumbered #1160 by ConnCo in 1915) and ran until 1948.  It was the focus of a recently-completed major restoration project.
    12 – ConnCo #1160
    13 – Manchester Street Railway #38, a gorgeous double-truck suburban car built in 1906 by the Laconia Car Company of New Hampshire. Originally this car ran on the Manchester & Nashua where it was car #4 and then car #32 before eventually being renumbered #38.  It was one of Seashore’s first three cars, acquired by the museum in 1940 prior to WWII.  It has been completely restored.
    14 – MSR #38 interior
    15 – BER #5821 on Visitors Center loop
    16 – ConnCo #838
    17 – ConnCo #838
    18 – BER #5821
    19 – BER #5821
    20 – Tower C was built in 1901 on the Atlantic Avenue elevated structure in central Boston and was located at North Station where the Atlantic Avenue section joined with the Charlestown Elevated and the north end of the Main Line elevated.  The tower was moved to Seashore in 1976 following closure of this section of the elevated, by then part of the Orange Line.
    21 – Visible in this photo are MBTA “Blue Line” cars #0622-0623 (built by Hawker-Siddeley in 1979 and acquired by Seashore in 2009) to the left, LIRR #4137 (described above) in the middle, and South Shore #32 (built by Standard Steel in 1929 and brought to Seashore in 1989) to the right of it.  Off to the right, beyond the caboose, are a couple of small rail grinders that were used by Boston Elevated Railway.
    22 – Montreal #2
    23 – MBTA #4006 is an E800 trolley bus built in 1976 by Flyer and retired in 2008.
    24 – MBTA #4028 is an E800 trolley bus built in 1976 by Flyer and retired in 2008.  Note the trolley bus overhead; Seashore does have a short stretch of trolley bus line which they plan to extend at some point.
    25 – Portsmouth Dover & York #108 is a very attractive double-truck RPO car built by Laconia in 1904.  It was later acquired by York Utilities and converted for use as a line car but has been restored to its earlier configuration by Seashore.  It has been at the museum since it was retired from service in 1949.
    26 – ConnCo #1160
    27 – MSR #38
    28 – Boston MTA #8361 is a model 45OS-102-43CX trolley bus built by Pullman-Standard in 1948.  It was the first trolley bus acquired by Seashore, coming to the museum in 1963 following retirement.  It is currently operational.
    29 – These are the “State of the Art Cars,” the SOAC pair, built in 1972 as testbed cars.  The bodies were built by St. Louis Car Company with electrical equipment provided by Boeing-Vertol.  They were built to Eastern subway clearances and were test-run in New York, Philadelphia and briefly operated on the Skokie Swift in Chicago, which was the only line that could easily be modified for their extra length and width.  They were acquired by Seashore in 1989.
    30 – Consolidated Railway #303 is a typical 15-bench open car built by Brill in 1901.  Originally it was Winchester Avenue Railway #303, then Fair Haven & Westville #303 before becoming Consolidated #303 and eventually being renumbered Connecticut Company #615.  The car ran until 1948 in Yale Bowl service and has been at Seashore since then.
    31 – Dunedin #105 is a cable car from New Zealand that was built in 1903 by Stansfield.  It was acquired by Seashore in 1957 after retirement from service.
    32 – Dunedin cable car grip
    33 – Wheeling Street Railway #639 is a rare Cincinnati curve-side suburban car built by Cincinnati in 1924.  Later it was owned by Co-Operative Transit and was retired in 1948.  Seashore acquired the body of this car in 1957 and during the 1990s and early 2000s it was completely restored to original condition, one of several “chicken coop” restorations Seashore has done.  It is currently the only operational Cincinnati curve-sider in existence.
    34 – Consolidated #303 bench
    35 – Consolidated #303
    36 – Wheeling #639
    37 – Sydney Tramways #1700 is a “compartment” streetcar built in 1925 by Meadowbank.  It ran in Sydney until 1960 and was acquired by Seashore the following year.
    38 – Wheeling #639 emblem
    39 – Twin City Rapid Transit #1267 is a standard single-end “gate car” from that city, built by the company shops in 1907 in class H-6.  It ran until 1953 and was acquired by Seashore that year.  It is one of two cars of this type currently preserved, the other being car #1239 which was restored from a body and is in operation Excelsior, MN.
    40 – DC Transit #1304 is a prewar PCC built by St. Louis in 1941 for Capital Transit.  It ran until 1961, when it was retired and sold to General Electric for use as a test car.  It was later sold to the Trolleyville museum in North Olmsted, OH, which sold it to Seashore in 1985.  It has been restored to its late-1950s condition while in service in Washington DC.
    41 – CNS&M #755 is one of five preserved cars from the Standard Steel order built for the North Shore in 1930.  It was acquired by Seashore in 1963 following abandonment of the North Shore and still wears its “Silverliner” color scheme.  This car is operational and is currently the focus of some restoration work.
    42 – TCRT #1239 gate closeup showing the distinctive design used for the gates on the open back platforms of these cars
    43 – Ottawa Transportation #B2 is a single-truck snow sweeper built by the Ottawa Car Manufacturing Company in 1926.  Though McGuire-Cummings was the company most closely associated with snow sweepers like these, several other companies including Brill, Ottawa, and Fowler built similar sweepers.  Ottawa #B2 was sold to Cornwall in 1959 and ran there until the wires came down in 1972, at which point it was acquired by Seashore.
    44 – Atlantic Shore Line #100 is a unique cab-on-flat locomotive built by Laconia in 1906.  It ran in revenue service on the same right-of-way currently used by Seashore for its main line and was later sold to York Utilities, where it ran until 1949.  It was acquired at that time by Seashore and during the early 2000s was completely restored to original condition.
    45 – Dallas Railway & Terminal #434 is the only pre-PCC city car from Dallas preserved intact.  Built by Stone & Webster in 1913, it ran until 1954 and was then acquired by Seashore.  It has operated at the museum regularly for years and is currently the focus of some rehabbing work.
    45 – DR&T #434
    46 – An overview of the Town House Restoration Shop with Eastern Massachusetts Street Railway lightweight car #7005 (built by Osgood-Bradley in 1927, later Boston Elevated Railway #4400, acquired by Seashore in 1950) in the foreground for heavy restoration and Blackpool #144 from England (homebuilt in 1925, acquired by Seashore in 1954) in the background.
    47 – Town House Restoration shop with EMSR #7005 in the foreground; in the background are Bay State Street railway #4175 (built by Laconia in 1914, acquired by Seashore in 1976 and the subject of a long-term restoration), Middlesex & Boston #41 (a single-truck car built by Stephenson in 1901 and acquired as a body by Seashore in 1962), and Blackpool #144.
    48 – Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority #01000 is an elevated car built by Wason in 1928 for use on the Main Line Elevated (later the Orange Line).  It was acquired by Seashore in 1980 and is operational.
    49 – CA&E #434 is one of two Cincinnati-built cars from the CA&E in preservation, the other being car #431 at IRM.  Car #434 was bought by Seashore from the railroad in 1962 and during the 1990s was completely restored to its 1950s appearance.
    50 – Chicago Surface Lines #225 was one of the cars regularly used on fan trips in Chicago during the mid-1950s and went to Seashore in 1957.  It is one of three preserved “Old Pullman” cars, the other two being #144 and #460, both at IRM.
    51 – CSL #225 motorman’s position
    52 – CSL #225 interior
    53 – CSL #225 interior
    54 – CSL #225 platform interior
    55 – CSL #225 number
    56 – CSL #225 emblem
    57 – CSL #225 number
    58 – CSL #225 lettering
    59 – The double-deck car is Glasgow #1274 from Scotland, a “Coronation” tram built in the company shops in 1940 and retired in 1963, when it was donated to Seashore.  The single-level car is Rome #279, buitl by Tabanelli in 1914 and retired in 1960.  It was the first car from continental Europe acquired by Seashore.
    60 – Union Street Railway #10 is a horsecar from New Bedford, MA that was built by Brill in 1885.  When service was electrified it was retained by the company as an historic relic and eventually made its way to Seashore in 1954.
    61 – a Suffolk County (MA) sherriff’s wagon for transporting prisoners, acquired by Seashore in 1983.
    62 – Union Street Railway #34 is a single-truck railway post office streetcar that was rebuilt in 1893 from a horsecar that had itself been built in 1880.  This car was retired in 1947 and acquired by Seashore at that time.
    63 – Rome car #279
    64 – Mousam River Railroad #8, a street railway freight trailer built by Portland in 1893.  It was in use until 1947, when it was acquired by Seashore.  It is thought to be the only street railway freight trailer preserved.
    65 – California Street #48 is a typical double-end cable car from the California Street line in San Francisco that was built in 1907 by Holman.  It was sold to an individual in Montreal in 1955 and was later acquired by Seashore in 1970.
    66 – California Street #48 number
    67 – Brooklyn & Queens Transit #4547 is a double-truck, double-end semi-convertible car built in 1906 by Jewett.  It ran for fifty years in Brooklyn.  Cars of this type were common on B&QT and were built by a couple of different car builders.  Seashore acquired #4547 in 1956.
    68 – Cleveland Street Railway #1227 is one of several preserved center-door cars from Cleveland but is the only one that has been backdated to original condition.  Built in 1914 by hometown car builder Kuhlman, it was sold for use on the suburban line to Shaker Heights in 1921 and was later renumbered Shaker Heights Rapid Transit #27.  During its time in suburban service it was rebuilt with Westinghouse MU control and other modifications.  Retired in 1960, it bounced around, from the National Capital Trolley Museum to Trolley Valhalla to Buckingham Valley Trolley Association to a private owner in Ohio.  Seashore acquired the car in 1984 by which time it was reduced to a badly deteriorated body.  During the early 2000s the car was completely restored to as-built condition.  In 2010 Seashore acquired Cleveland center-door trailer #2365 from Trolleyville and there are plans to restore that car to match #1227.
    69 – Montreal & Southern Counties #504 is a large freight motor built in 1924 by Ottawa.  It was used in service out of Montreal until 1956, when it was acquired by Seashore
    70 – Montreal & Southern Counties #610 is a heavy interurban car built by Ottawa in 1922, quite late for wood car construction.  It saw regular operation until 1956, when it was donated to Seashore.
    71 – Rome #279 emblem
    72 – CA&E #434
    73 – Rome #279
    74 – Brooklyn & Queens Transit #4547
    75 – The “City of Manchester” is arguably the most opulent car preserved at Seashore.  It was built in 1898 by Briggs Carriage Company for the Manchester Street Railway.  Its precise retirement date is uncertain but in 1952 the car’s body was being used as a children’s playhouse when it was acquired by Seashore.  This was likely the first electric car body ever acquired by an American museum in derelict condition and the first full “chicken coop” restoration done by a U.S. trolley museum.  The car was restored during the early 1960s and has run at Seashore ever since.
    76 – Cleveland #1227 interior; in later years Shaker Heights Rapid Transit replaced the bench seats on the left side of the car with standard lateral seats, but Seashore backdated the car to this condition.
    77 – MSR “City of Manchester” lettering
    78 – Claremont Railway #4 is a homebuilt line car built by this small New Hampshire system.  It was acquired by Seashore in 1955. At one point it was briefly loaned to the MBTA.
    79 – Biddeford & Saco #31 was the first streetcar acquired by Seashore, in 1939, making it the first streetcar acquired by any U.S. trolley museum for preservation.  It is a 12-bench double-truck open car built by Brill in 1900 and was used until the B&S was abandoned in 1939.  It has been completely restored.
    80 – Lehigh Valley Transit #1030 is one of two preserved ex-Indiana Railroad highspeeds.  It was built by AC&F in 1931 as Indiana Railroad #55 and in 1934 was converted into a full-length parlor car.  After the Indiana Railroad quit service in 1941 this car was sold to LVT, which rebuilt it with a left-side front door and a door at the rear of the car (for emergency egress on the Norristown trestle).  It operated for LVT until 1951, when it was acquired by Seashore.  The other ex-Indiana Railroad highspeed, car #65, went to the Cedar Rapids & Iowa City and in 1953 became the first car owned by the Illinois Railway Museum.
    81 – LVT #1030 letterboard
    82 – LVT #1030 letterboard
    83 – LVT #1030 letterboard
    84 – LVT #1030 motorman’s position; note the left-side door and trap installed by LVT.
    85 – LVT #1030 interior
    86 – LVT #1030 washroom
    87 – LVT #1030 interior
    88 – LVT #1030 motorman’s position
    89 – LVT #1030 interior – old IRR number
    90 – LVT #1030 interior
    91 – LVT #1030 interior fan
    92 – LVT #1030 interior
    93 – LVT #1030 front
    94 – LVT #1030 number
    95 – LVT #1030 rear
    96 – Overview of some of Seashore’s bus collection, with New Orleans #333 (Flxible 1967), Portland #504 (GMC 1950), Peninsula Transportation #195 (Mack 1959), Toronto #7521 (Flyer 1972), Omaha articulated #1312 (Twin Coach 1947) and others visible.
    97 – Some of Seashore’s bus collection, with MBTA #9138 (Flyer 1982), MBTA #6169 (GMC 1967), New Orleans #333 (Flxible 1967), and Portland #504 (GMC 1950) visible
    98 – Some of Seashore’s bus collection, with WMATA #6481 (GMC 1964), Manchester #107 (GMC 1974), Cape Ann #7804 (GMC 1979) and MBTA #9138 (Flyer 1982) visible
    99 – MBTA motor bus #8400 (GMC 1985) and Swiss trolley bus #653 (FBW/EGGLI/BBC 1964) with an MBTA Red Line car in the background

    Regards,

    Frank Hicks

    P1020337Here are some pictures from my recent trip to the Seashore Trolley Museum in Kennebunkport, Maine,the first time I’d been there in 35 years. Seashore (originally called the Seashore Electric Railway), founded in 1939, is the first and oldest trolley museum in the United States, and has a vast collection, truly international in scope.

    We thought we would make a contest out of identifying the various cars, buses, and artifacts in the photos.First prize will be a copy of our new “Spirit of 76″ DVD collection, which includes the first 76 CERA Bulletins, issued between 1938 and 1947, plus bonus features.

    To enter the contest, send us a list identifying what you see in these pictures. The best and most complete answer received at cerablog1@gmail.com by midnight Central Time on Thursday, September 4, 2014 will be the winner.

    All photos were taken by me on August 16, 2014. There’s a lot to identify here, so I wish you good luck in figuring it all out. When referring to individual photos, please use the image numbers so that individual pictures can be matched to the descriptions. Once the contest ends, we will add captions to each picture.

    Good luck!

    -David Sadowski

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    The rest of the photos in next post

  • Thursday, August 28, 2014 4:58 PM | Ed Graziano (Administrator)

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  • Thursday, August 28, 2014 4:55 PM | Ed Graziano (Administrator)

    Editor’s Note:

    To read the winning contest answers, click here.

     

    Here are some pictures from my recent trip to the Seashore Trolley Museum in Kennebunkport, Maine,the first time I’d been there in 35 years. Seashore (originally called the Seashore Electric Railway), founded in 1939, is the first and oldest trolley museum in the United States, and has a vast collection, truly international in scope.

    We thought we would make a contest out of identifying the various cars, buses, and artifacts in the photos.First prize will be a copy of our new “Spirit of 76″ DVD collection, which includes the first 76 CERA Bulletins, issued between 1938 and 1947, plus bonus features.

    To enter the contest, send us a list identifying what you see in these pictures. The best and most complete answer received at cerablog1@gmail.com by midnight Central Time on Thursday, September 4, 2014 will be the winner.

    All photos were taken by me on August 16, 2014. There’s a lot to identify here, so I wish you good luck in figuring it all out. When referring to individual photos, please use the image numbers so that individual pictures can be matched to the descriptions. Once the contest ends, we will add captions to each picture.

    Good luck!

    -David Sadowski

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